New Richmond Running Club

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2013 Terror In The Glen Trail Run

 

  

ABOUT

This is an Eco Friendly Trail Run throughout Glen Hills Park. Proceeds to benefit the Glenwood City High School Scholarship Program
 
 
 
 
 
DESCRIPTION
 
5K COURSE STARTS AT 9:15 AM

Mowed grassy meadow friendly to walkers and runners

 

 

 6.2 MILE COURSE STARTS AT 9:00 AM

Mowed grassy meadow to hilly wooded single track that is rooted rocky and rugged
 
HALF MARATHON COURSE STARTS AT 9:00 AM
2 loops of 6.2 mile course


 
 
 
ECO FRIENDLY AID STATIONS (NO CUPS)
 
PLEASE BRING YOUR OWN WATER BOTTLE OR UTILIZE THE WATER BOTTLE FROM YOUR RACE PACKET

 
 
 
 
 
REGISTRATION
 

"BEST DEAL" EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION ENDS AUGUST 1

5K ~ $30      10K ~ $35      HALF ~ $40 

 

 

GENERAL REGISTRATION ENDS OCTOBER 5 

5K ~ $40      10K ~ $45      HALF ~ $50

 

 

RACE DAY REGISTRATION OCTOBER 26

5K ~ $50      10K ~ $55     HALF ~ $60

 

 

INCLUDED WITH REGISTRATION

FULLY DESIGNED LONG SLEEVE T-SHIRT

 $7.00 PARK PASS

 WATER BOTTLE

CHIP TIMING

FOOD AND DRINK

AWARDS AND DOOR PRIZES

 

CHIP TIMING AND REGISTRATION AT 

ACTIVE.COM:

 http://www.active.com/running/glenwood-wi/terror-in-the-glen-trail-run-2013

 

OR ANDERSON RACES

 www.andersonraces.com 

 

 

 

AWARDS
 

OVERALL MAN AND WOMAN WINNER IN EACH RACE RECEIVE TOP PRIZE 

 

 

 

 AGE GROUP WINNERS GET THE CHEESE! 

 (0 - 19)  (20 - 29)  (30 - 39)  (40 - 49)  (50 - 59)  (60 - 69)  (70 - UP) 

 

 
 
DOOR PRIZES
 
Fresh baked goods
 
Coupons and Gift Certificates

Personalized Road ID Bracelets
 
 
FACILITIES
Bathrooms available at the start / finish area and each aid station
 
REFRESHMENTS
 
2 on course aid stations with water and sports drink.
 
 BRING YOUR WATER BOTTLE


Refreshments available for athletes at start / finish area
  food and drink available for purchase to benefit scholarship fund.

 

 

CONTACT

 

Bob Heise

bob.heise@co.saint-croix.wi.us

OUR WONDERFUL SPONSORS

 

  WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE A SPONSOR?

 

Members Area

 

"Keep it local" is the new buzz going around for this racing season! Larger organized runs are charging insane amounts of cash and will not guarantee you'll be able to run! Local hometown races are where this all began and most of these races are over 30 years old. Please support these races as the money involved goes directly to these towns to improve a child's future, pathways and historic sites.

Recent Photos

Upcoming Events

Saturday, Sep 27 at 7:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Saturday, Sep 27 at 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Saturday, Oct 11 at 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Newest Members

Twin Cities Marathon Week #16

Monday:  OFF

Tuesday:  8 - 9 Intervals or track

Wednesday:  12 miles easy

Thursday:   7 miles easy

Friday:   7 miles easy

Saturday:  8 miles medium effort

Sunday:  15 miles easy

 

Hydration Guideline for Runners

SIPPING POINTS

ONE HOUR OR LESS

Three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. Water is usually fine. For a tough run over 30 minutes, consider a sports drink to give you a kick of energy at the end.

ONE TO FOUR HOURS

Three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. A sports drink with carbs and electrolytes will replenish sodium. Prefer gels? Chase them with water to avoid sugar overload.

OVER FOUR HOURS

Drink three to six ounces of sports drink every 15 minutes, after which use thirst as your main guide (drinking more if you're thirsty and less if you're not).

POSTRUN

Replace fluids, drinking enough so you have to use the bathroom within 60 to 90 minutes postrun. Usually eight to 24 ounces is fine, but it varies based on running conditions.

J Rose Massge

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Talk to Candy or Jeremy for more details!

J Rose Massage

Top 5 Marathon Mistakes

A marathon presents you with 26.2 miles of opportunity. Sidestep these common training and racing errors to have a great day.

Mistake #1: I dressed all wrong

My long, reddish curls can take on a life of their own, so I take headwear seriously. On one unfortunate destination marathon morning, my beloved purple bandana went missing, forcing me to wear a hot, black, cotton baseball cap. By mile eight it was saturated with sweat, but because it was adorned with pins from previous races, I couldn't bear to chuck it. With hat in one hand and a water bottle in the other, I ran the rest of the race squinting, my sunglasses on my head in a failed attempt to keep my humidity-crazed locks out of my face. Twice I had to pull over to tighten the shirt and the jacket tied around my waist–a product of race-morning indecision and refusal to part with spendy garments.

Lesson Learned: Bring layers

Before you travel, make a list of everything you plan to bring, down to extra shoelaces if that's the minutiae you're into–and cross it off as you stow it. "I pack three different outfits: my hotter-than-blazes outfit, my 'Where did this cold front come from?' outfit, and a pair of capris and a lightweight long-sleeve shirt for something in the middle," says Blackford. Bring a visor for a hot day, a brimmed cap for a sunny but temperate day, and a light tech-fabric beanie for a cold one. Worried about temperature fluctuations over the course? Consider arm warmers or one lightweight long-sleeve top you can tie around your waist.

Aside from your base layer, do not wear expensive clothes or things with sentimental value. It's better to be too cold than too hot. "Ten minutes of moving and you are going to wonder why you're wearing all this stuff," says Guzman.

Mistake #2: I got cold and wet

After a few days of rain or even a crisp morning dew, the soft grasses that surround many a race starting line or athletes' village can be transformed into a muddy sea of goo. At races that have required me to arrive at the start hours before the gun went off, I have looked longingly at runners sprawled out stretching and meditating on Hefty bags they had brought. I once waited for a group to have their wave called and poached their make-shift tarp from the garbage–along with a trashy tabloid to keep my mind off what lay ahead.

Lesson Learned: Bring a survival kit

Big Sur, New York, Boston, and Grandma's all have notoriously long morning waits. And if you're smart, you'll arrive early no matter where you are running. Bring a plastic trash bag to sit on, a newspaper or magazine to read, and some throwaway sweats to keep warm–most big races now collect clothes for homeless shelters.

Mistake #3: I went out too fast

I admit it. This is, and has always been, my tragic downfall. Whether it's a massive metropolitan race with 25,000 fellow runners or a quaint mountain run with 250, the frenetic energy at the start is irresistible. Throw in an elevation drop at the start, and I am doomed. At one recent mountain marathon, I burst out of the gate with a joyful surge and didn't realize until around mile three that I was two minutes ahead of where I should have been. Yes, I should have been alarmed. But for a proud instant, I thought, Cool?! By mile six, I longed for a nap.

Lesson Learned: Hold back. Settle in. Finish strong.

Many runners have a tendency to want to "bank time" at the beginning. "That is the absolute worst way to run a race," says Manthey, "because you burn through your glycogen stores early on." Instead, think of the first few miles as an extended warmup, and run them slightly slower than goal pace (see "A Good Pace to Run a Marathon," on page 50, for a finish-strong pacing strategy). If you reach mile one significantly slower than goal pace, don't panic, says Suzanne Walmsley, a coach with the Boston Athletic Association Running Club. "You have plenty of miles to make up that time."

Mistake #4: I hyped the finish

On a rare occasion when my husband got to travel with me to a race, I thought he could cheer wildly as I crossed the finish, then sweep me off to a nearby watering hole for a celebratory ale. I am told that he did, actually, see me cross. But I did not see him for nearly 90 minutes. Instead, I joined a crush of sweaty finishers for a grueling march toward Gatorade, a Mylar blanket, and a medal, after which we rounded a corner en route to the family meeting area straight into a blast of wind. Meanwhile, my dear husband had to walk a dozen blocks to get around the barricaded finish line. By the time he reached me, crumpled under my silver blankets trying to call him on a borrowed cell, I had melted into a delirious puddle.

Lesson Learned: Make a postrace plan

Scout out a separate meeting place within walking distance of the finish and reachable despite course or roadblocks. (Blackford advises against using the family meeting area, which can be crowded and chaotic.) Write clear directions on the back of your bib so you can find your meeting place in your postrace state. And pick up a unique balloon for your support crew to carry. Even in a sea of spectators, a giant Tweety Bird will catch your eye. Finally, have a drop-dead time when, if you haven't found each other, you agree to head back to the hotel or car.

Mistake #5: I forgot the fun

Typically, I spend too much time obsessing over sock choice and gel flavor, panicking at the starting line, and neurotically checking my watch mile by mile. Fortunately, there always comes a time when the overachiever in me shuts up long enough for me to remember why I do these things. Suddenly, the cheers and cowbells seem louder, the sideline signs–"Go Mom," "We Love You Dad"–more vivid, and the other runners like comrades rather than competitors.

At my last race, the grueling but spectacular Rim Rock Marathon in Fruita, Colorado, it took until mile 25, when my husband and two daughters pulled up, honking and screaming. My 13-year-old cross-country runner hopped out of the car and fell in beside me, instantly noticing my glassy eyes and stony face. As our footfalls fell in sync, she delivered a piece of advice no runner should forget.

"Look around at how awesome this is," she said. "Remember, Mom, this is supposed to be fun."

Taper Time!

Taper Time

RACE WEEK

At this point, it's all about staying rested and getting mentally prepared. This week, aim to sleep eight hours a night and stay off your feet as much as you can—reducing stress on your body will allow it to top off its glycogen and maintain adequate hydration levels. To combat nerves, schedule movie nights, start a new book, or visualize races you've enjoyed. "Pump your mind full of positives," says Kamphoff. "Use all your senses to create how you'd like your race to go."

RUN IT: "This is a time of high nerves, and some athletes feel they need to run to calm themselves," says Hamilton. Which is fine—but take it real easy and reduce your running to just four days this week. New marathoners may run no more than three or four miles at a time, while advanced runners may do a couple of six-milers early in the week. A very light, race-pace workout early in the week can help you stay sharp. Run one to four miles at marathon pace with a one-mile warm-up and cooldown. First-timers looking to simply finish shouldn't worry about a sharpening workout. "It's more important to get to the start well-rested and injury-free," says Hamilton.

The New Boston Qualifying Standard

2014 QUALIFYING STANDARDS

 

Age Group   MEN       WOMEN

18-34         3:05:00      3:35:00

35-39         3:10:00      3:40:00

40-44         3:15:00      3:45:00

45-49         3:25:00      3:55:00

50-54         3:30:00      4:00:00

55-59         3:40:00      4:10:00

60-64         3:55:00      4:25:00

65-69         4:10:00      4:40:00

70-74         4:25:00      4:55:00

75-79         4:40:00      5:10:00

80 and up  4:55:00     5:25:00

Racing in Hot Weather?

 

Now you can calculate exactly how much heat is impacting your race & workout times

Race Time Predictor

The New Richmond Centre

Welcome to the Centre!

Facility Hours

MONDAY-THURSDAY (OCT-APRIL)  

4:45 AM - 10:00 PM

MONDAY-THURSDAY (MAY-SEPT)   

4:45 AM - 9:00 PM

FRIDAY                                          

 4:45 AM - 8:00 PM

SATURDAY & SUNDAY                    

7:00 AM - 8:00 PM

The Training Room

At The Training Room we attend to your entire well-being, your emotional and physical health.  We believe it’s all connected.  Our qualified staff of professionals are dedicated to providing each member with the personal attention they want and the professionally designed fitness programs they need.

www.thetrainingroomosi.com

NRRC 2013 FILM

Need some inspiration to get out the door?

Watch this!

NRRC 2013 Short Film

The NRRC

The New Richmond Running Club

Questions? Comments? Concerns?

Contact: joe-brick@hotmail.com