New Richmond Running Club

Click here to edit subtitle

Welcome Runners!

Quote of the Week


Losing weight isn't tough. If you don't eat for a month you're dead. It's the hunger that gets ya...
-Overheard on the run

Picture of the Week

Terror in the Glen

A beautiful morning for running at Glen Hills 2nd annual Terror in the Glen run!

Click Here For Results!

In the News


Karen and Peggy run Mankato 10K


1 male bib # available for CIM Marathon


Man loses 400 pounds and will run first half marathon in Detroit!


Brent shows his face for the Wednesday Club Run!


Exercise lowers depression by 19 percent!


Heebink, Karen and Brick sidelined with injuries!


Baltimore marathon advises spectators of appropriate cheers?


2014 Chicago Marathon

Twin Cities Marathon

Results @ tcmevents.org!

Women Run The Cities

Heritage days road race 

Fox Valley Marathon

IRONMAN WISCONSIN

SAWOOTH!

Tunnel Trails Big Apple Marathon

Members Area

"Keep it local" is the new buzz going around for this racing season! Larger organized runs are charging insane amounts of cash and will not guarantee you'll be able to run! Local hometown races are where this all began and most of these races are over 30 years old. Please support these races as the money involved goes directly to these towns to improve a child's future, pathways and historic sites.

Recent Photos

Upcoming Events

Saturday, Oct 25 at 10:00 PM - 11:00 PM

Newest Members

Running All The Time And Not Losing Weight?


Six Ways to Stick to Your Weight-Loss Resolution
by jenny Hadfield
 
  • Sit down with a journal and write down one thing you want to focus on. That could be adding veggies to your lunch and dinner, replacing your Venti Mocha with an herbal tea, eating more slowly, planning your meals ahead of time, or shopping for healthy foods more frequently. 
     
  • Now that you've got your target goal, make it a priority in your life. For instance, make room in your schedule to shop on Sundays and prepare meals you can eat for the week. Write out a menu for the week and the ingredients you'll need handy to eat healthy all week. Set yourself up for success by making your goal a priority in your life. 
     
  • Create a supportive environment. Post your goal where you can see it daily, tell your family and friends, and post it on social media. Social support is a key ingredient to achievement.
     
  • Be prepared for ups and downs. Every marathoner knows there are good days and not-so-good ones, and making lifelong changes are no different. Just like running a bad race teaches you the most lessons, so do slipups in behavior change. Be prepared for them, and when they slip into your life, be mindful that they are there and reflect on what they are teaching you. In my case, I slip up when I travel and eat less healthy food. My reflection is always in the form of how I feel because I know it is directly related to my food choices on the road.
     
  • Manage your energy. Maintaining motivation and optimism happens more often when our energy is even and managed. Fatigue, lack of sleep, stress or over-training can lead to psychological shifts in not only our optimism, but also how we view ourselves and our lives. By keeping tabs on commitments, training load, and other energy-zapping areas, we can begin to make better choices and work into a consistent positive energy flow. This is a challenge these days, but even little changes make a difference. I have a client who for years has been running marathon after marathon and gaining weight along the way. After taking time off running long, she's got a better life balance and has lost a significant amount of weight. 
     
  • Keep a journal of what works for you. The fundamental reason all diets don't work for everyone is that we are all different. What works for me may not for you. It's best to be mindful of the foods that make you feel good versus the ones that don't and create your own personal healthy menu. 

Give yourself time to master your first goal before you move on to the next one. You may be surprised at the impact one little goal can have on your health. Invest in it, practice it until it becomes familiar, and then write down another one. The confidence you feel from achieving the first goal will inspire you to go for another one. 

The success of making one small change creates the confidence and fuels the inspiration to continue making positive change.

 Your Best Foot Forward


  • By Melanie McQuaid

An effort to strengthen your feet can make the difference in your speed, form and resistance to injury.

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Poor coordination of the feet is often the root cause of lower-leg running injuries. There are two main reasons for this: The neuromuscular pathway from the brain to the feet is the longest in the body, making for slow and inefficient coordination, and the small amount of muscle in the feet makes it difficult for the brain to coordinate proprioception and balance.

“There are 26 bones that make up the foot and ankle, dozens of joints and tendons that separate and move each bone,” says Dr. Kathy Coutinho, an applied kinesiologist, a certified chiropractic sports physician and an Active Release Technique (A.R.T.) provider. “A weakened structure in one area of the foot or ankle means all other tissues in the immediate area have to make up for that imbalance. Then begins the slow downward cycle of compensation and wear and tear that can lead to all sorts of nightmare injuries like the dreaded plantar fasciitis.”

By challenging the feet, you can create clearer neuromuscular pathways to the brain and therefore help prevent future injuries. The following drills will only take three minutes at the end of your warmup before every run. They should be completed in bare feet.

Six Every-Run Drills
(do each for 30 seconds on a soft surface)

1. Invert: Walk on the outside of your foot.
2. Evert: Walk on the inside of your foot.
3. Adduct: Walk pigeon-toed, or with your toes pointing in.
4. Charlie Chaplin: Walk with your toes pointing out.
5. High heels: Walk backward on your toes.
6.Heels: Walk on your heels—do this one with shoes to prevent bone bruising.

The Daily 7



 1. Drink A Glass Of Water As Soon As You Wake UpThis rehydrates your body, revs up your digestive system, and gets things flowing. You may notice positive changes like clearer skin and better digestion. Bonus points if you add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice or a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar.

2. Do Not Check Your Email Or Phone For At Least An HourDo you sleep with your cell phone next to you and grab for it first thing when you wake? This is not a good habit. If you choose to resist the temptation to check your email and Facebook feed until at least an hour after waking up, you'll find that your mind is more clear, focused and happy.

3. Think Of One Thing For Which You Have GratitudeThis sets the stage for positivity throughout the day. If you come up with three or five things, even better.

4. Step Outside And Take A Deep Breath Fill your lungs with fresh air. Even if it’s cold outside. This only takes 10 seconds! It reminds you that you are alive and breathing.

5. Move Your Body You don’t necessarily have to do an intense workout before breakfast, but moving your body even a little is a great way to get the blood flowing and shake the body into wake-up mode. Simply doing a few stretches is a great option. Or turn on your favorite song and dance like no one is watching.

6. Take Time To Eat A Healthy BreakfastRather than reaching for a box of cereal, focus on getting real foods in your body. Eggs, soaked oats, and smoothies are all great options. (And they really don’t take that much time to prepare.) Try it out.

7. Say Your Affirmations Look into the mirror and say something positive to yourself. Some ideas:

  • I radiate beauty, confidence and grace.
  • Every cell in my body is healthy and vibrant.
  • I feel great when I take care of myself.

Hydration Guideline for Runners








ONE HOUR OR LESS

Three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. Water is usually fine. For a tough run over 30 minutes, consider a sports drink to give you a kick of energy at the end.

ONE TO FOUR HOURS

Three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. A sports drink with carbs and electrolytes will replenish sodium. Prefer gels? Chase them with water to avoid sugar overload.

OVER FOUR HOURS

Drink three to six ounces of sports drink every 15 minutes, after which use thirst as your main guide (drinking more if you're thirsty and less if you're not).

POSTRUN

Replace fluids, drinking enough so you have to use the bathroom within 60 to 90 minutes postrun. Usually eight to 24 ounces is fine, but it varies based on running conditions.

J Rose Massage

Investing in massage is an investment in your health. At J Rose Massage, we wish to offer you many options to suit your budget and therapy needs. Call 715-529-9182 to inquire about additional seasonal bundles and specials.


The New Richmond Running Club

Questions? Comments? Concerns?

Contact: joe-brick@hotmail.com